What happened to all the mentors?

January 31, 2013 · Posted in Gentoo · 2 Comments 

I had this post in the Drafts for a while, but now it’s time to publish it since the situation does not seem to be improving at all.

As you probably now, if you want to become a Gentoo developer, you need to find yourself a mentor[1]. This used to be easy. I mean, all you had to do was to contact the teams you were interested in contributing as a developer and then one of the team members would step up and help you with your quizzes. However, lately, I find myself in the weird situation of having to become a mentor myself because potential recruits come back to recruiters and say that they could not find someone from the teams to help them. This is sub-optimal  for a couple of reasons. First of all, time constrains  Mentoring someone can take days, weeks or months. Recruiting someone after being trained (properly or not), can also take days, weeks or months. So somehow, I ended up spending twice as much time as I used to.  So we are back to those good old days, where someone needed to wait months before we fully recruit him. Secondly, a mentor and a recruiter should be different persons. This is necessary for recruits to gain a wider and more efficient training as different people will focus on different areas during this training period.

One may wonder, why teams are not willing to spend time to train new developers. I guess, this is because training people takes quite a lot of someone’s time and people tend to prefer fixing bugs and writing code than spending time training people. Another reason could be that teams are short on manpower, so try are mostly busy with other stuff and they just can’t do both at the same time. Others just don’t feel ready to become mentors which is rather weird because every developer was once a mentee. So it’s not like they haven’t done something similar before. Truth is that this seems to be a vicious circle. No manpower to train people -> less people are trained -> Not enough manpower in the teams.

In my opinion, getting more people on board is absolutely crucial for Gentoo. I strongly believe that people must spend time training new people because a) They could offload work to them ;) and b) it’s a bit sad to have quite a few interested and motivated people out there and not spend time to train them properly and get them on board. I sincerely hope this is a temporary situation and things will become better in the future.

ps: I will be in FOSDEM this weekend. If you are there and you would like to discuss about the Gentoo recruitment process or anything else, come and find me ;)

 

[1] http://www.gentoo.org/proj/en/devrel/handbook/handbook.xml?part=1&chap=2#doc_chap3

Proxy Maintainers – How do we perform?

December 13, 2012 · Posted in Gentoo, Linux · 1 Comment 

Following my recent recruitment performance post, here comes the second part of my Gentoo Miniconf 2012 presentation. The following two graphs aim to demonstrate the performance of proxy-maintainers aka, how Gentoo users help us improve and push new ebuilds to the portage tree

Orphaned Packages 2012/10Orphaned Packages 2012/12

One can notice the increased number of maintainer-needed@ packages but this is because we “retired” a lot of inactive developers in the last 2 months. I expect this number to not increase further in the near future.

I would like to thank all of you who are actively participating in this team. Keep up the good work!

Gentoo Recruitment: How do we perform?

October 25, 2012 · Posted in Gentoo, Linux · 50 Comments 

A couple of days ago, Tomas and I, gave a presentation at the Gentoo Miniconf. The subject of the presentation was to give an overview of the current recruitment process, how are we performing compared to the previous years and what other ways there are for users to help us improve our beloved distribution. In this blog post I am gonna get into some details that I did not have the time to address during the presentation regarding our recruitment process.

 

Recruitment Statistics

Recruitment Statistics from 2008 to 2012

Looking at the previous graph, two things are obvious. First of all, every year the number of people who wanted to become developers is constantly decreased. Second, we have a significant number of people who did not manage to become developers. Let me express my personal thoughts on these two things.

For the first one, my opinion is that these numbers are directly related to the Gentoo’s reputation and its “infiltration” to power users. It is not a secret that Gentoo is not as popular as it used to be. Some people think this is because of the quality of our packages, or because of the frequency we cause headaches to our users. Other people think that the “I want to compile every bit of my linux box” trend belongs to the past and people want to spend less time maintaining/updating their boxes and more time doing some actual work nowadays. Either way, for the past few years we are loosing people, or to state it better, we are not “hiring” as many as we used to. Ignoring those who did not manage to become developers, we must admit that the absolute numbers are not in our favor. One may say that, 16 developers for 2011-2012 is not bad at all, but we aim for the best right? What bothers me the most is not the number of the people we recruit, but that this number is constantly falling for the last 5 years…

As for the second observation, we see that, every year, around 4-5 people give up and decide to not become developers after all. Why is that? The answer is obvious. Our long, painful, exhausting recruitment process drives people away. From my experience, it takes about 2 months from the time your mentor opens your bug, until a recruiter picks you up. This obviously kills someone’s motivation, makes him lose interest, get busy with other stuff and he eventually disappears. We tried to improve this process by creating a webapp two years ago, but it did not work out well. So we are now back to square one. We really can’t afford loosing developers because of our recruitment process. It is embarrassing to say at least.

Again, is there anything that can be done? Definitely yes. I’d say, we need an improved or a brand new web application that will focus on two things:

1) make the review process between mentor <-> recruit easier

2) make the final review process between recruit <-> recruiter an enjoyable learning process

Ideas are always welcomed. Volunteers and practical solutions even more ;) In the meantime, I am considering using Google+ hangouts for the face-to-face interview sessions with the upcoming recruits. This should bring some fresh air to this process ;)

The entire presentation can be found here

Gentoo Screenshot Contest 2012

July 8, 2012 · Posted in Gentoo, Linux · Comment 

Same as the previous year, and the year before, we are doing it again! Submit your pretty screenshot and gain a place in the Hall of Fame.

Pysmssend-1.48 is out!

June 3, 2012 · Posted in Linux, Projects · 6 Comments 

It’s been long time since I last made a new release for pysmssend. This release fixes a couple of bugs for the Forthnet and Voipbuster accounts. My free time is very limited and I don’t actively maintain this application anymore, so if you would like to step up and fix/improve this application let me know ;)

Next Page »

Gentoo Miniconf
Patras Wireless Metropolitan Network
Planet Hellug
iloog
forum hellug

css.php